Be A Hero To Your Clients: Avoid The Oregon Trail

dysentery

Your clients look to you to provide great designs, programs and above all, great rates, right?

For your clients who sell online, one of their top-of-mind concerns is likely receiving their funds in a timely manner. They’re looking to you to not only identify the most reliable merchant service platforms, but they want efficiency, too. Waiting for funds to hit your account can be a patience-sucking hassle.

Merchant processing providers are really starting to step up to the plate, though, and are taking some positive steps to better serve business owners. And isn’t keeping your clients happy the name of the game?

Although 3rd party payment services, such as PayPal and Google Checkout, are widely used, often a necessary and may even be an important component to your overall ecommerce strategy, having a true merchant account offers your business more control and quicker access to your funds.

Surely, you design-savvy developers and programmers (of the 80’s at least) remember the glory days of what will perhaps be remembered as one of the truly epic computer learning programs: The Oregon Trail. Are your clients relying on a rickety old stage coach to deliver their funds, or are you helping them stay current with emerging solutions? All I’m saying, friends, is that there are options. Options that save your clients money, which only makes them love you more.

If you take away one thing from this post, consider this: Don’t let their funds get held up by the dreaded “dysentery,” otherwise known as The Oregon Trail’s green-screen of death.

So, per usual, inquiring minds would love to know. Have you dusted off your merchant processing plans recently? Are you actively educating your clients on what’s new? If not, what’s stalling you? Besides an ever-growing to-do list of course…

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